they-dont-care-about-you

They Don’t Care About You

This article is the second in a series to help empower you to find success in online marketing. You can read the first article here.


In the last post, we walked through one of the first tips that you need to keep in mind while mass-marketing online: Write to the individual.

There has to be a sense of individual attention in your emails. When you receive an email from a corporation, for example, even if it has your first name and clearly knows who you are, you understand that a person did not sit down and write a personal email to you. But as an individual that is writing marketing campaigns yourself, you can correct for that. Write your email as if it were from you to one person, even though you know it’s going to hundreds or thousands. That personal touch can make all the difference on the margins when you’re sending bulk campaigns out weekly.

But adding a bit of a personal touch to the email doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be raking in clients immediately. It’s one step in a process that can help improve your results.

Another step you can take is to understand the psychology behind marketing in general. You are approaching a stranger to offer them a service or product you provide. It’s up to them whether or not they purchase it.

You are approaching a stranger to offer them a service or product you provide. It’s up to them whether or not they purchase it.

The upshot of this is that, unless the good you’re trying to provide aligns perfectly with their needs, it’s going to take some persuasion to close the deal. Here’s the thing: The people you’re targeting don’t care about you. For them it’s transactional.

What does that mean for you? It may sound like bad news at first, but in fact you now have a leg up on your competitors. While they focus on talking up themselves or their products, you can utilize some of these tips to stand out from the crowd.

Remember, you’re marketing to other humans, not just text in a spreadsheet. The consumer cares about their own needs, just as anyone else would. The big three buckets these needs fall into are health, wealth and relationships.

The consumer cares about their own needs, just as anyone else would. The big three buckets these needs fall into are health, wealth and relationships.

Keep those three in mind when you’re crafting your message, and ask yourself these questions when you proof an email prior to sending it:

Does this content speak to their needs? What are they concerned about, and how does this address that concern?

What goals do they have? What desires? How does my email address those aspirations and offer a way to achieve them?

Frame your message around the wants and needs of your audience. Now, you’re combining the lessons in the first article with these new skills, and you’re that much closer to more deals and more money in your pocket.

To recap so far: Write your emails directly to the individual, as if you were sending a personal note to one person, not a mass email to thousands. And once you’ve individualized the email, review it to ensure it speaks to what that person wants. It’s easy to fall into the trap of talking up yourself or your product, but identifying what makes it essential to your target audience will yield far better results than bragging about your own success.

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